The #1 New York Times–bestselling story about the American Olympic rowing triumph in Nazi Germany—from the author of Facing the Mountain. For readers of Unbroken, out of the depths of the Depression comes an irresistible story about beating the odds and finding hope in the most desperate of times—the improbable, intimate account of how nine working-class boys from the American West showed the world at the 1936 Olympics in Berlin what true grit really meant. It was an unlikely quest from the start. With a team composed of the sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the University of Washington’s eight-oar crew team was never expected to defeat the elite teams of the East Coast and Great Britain, yet they did, going on to shock the world by defeating the German team rowing for Adolf Hitler. The emotional heart of the tale lies with Joe Rantz, a teenager without family or prospects, who rows not only to regain his shattered self-regard but also to find a real place for himself in the world. Drawing on the boys’ own journals and vivid memories of a once-in-a-lifetime shared dream, Brown has created an unforgettable portrait of an era, a celebration of a remarkable achievement, and a chronicle of one extraordinary young man’s personal quest.

Author Daniel James Brown
Isbn 1101622741
Genre Sports & Recreation
Year 2013-06-04
Pages 432
Language English
File format PDF

The #1 New York Times bestseller about the Greatest Generation freshly adapted for the next generation. For readers of Unbroken, out of the depths of the Great Depression comes the astonishing tale of nine working-class boys from the American West who at the 1936 Olympics showed the world what true grit really meant. With rowers who were the sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the University of Washington’s eight-oar crew was never expected to defeat the elite East Coast teams, yet they did, going on to shock the world by challenging the German boat rowing for Adolf Hitler. At the center of the tale is Joe Rantz, a teenager without family or prospects, whose personal quest captures the spirit of his generation—the generation that would prove in the coming years that the Nazis could not prevail over American determination and optimism. This deeply emotional yet easily accessible young readers adaptation of the award-winning #1 New York Times bestseller features never-before-seen photographs, highly visual back matter, and an exclusive new introduction.

Author Daniel James Brown
Isbn 0698197593
Genre Juvenile Nonfiction
Year 2015-09-08
Pages 240
Language English
File format PDF

On September 1, 1894 two forest fires converged on the town of Hinckley, Minnesota, trapping over 2,000 people. Daniel J. Brown recounts the events surrounding the fire in the first and only book on to chronicle the dramatic story that unfolded. Whereas Oregon's famous "Biscuit" fire in 2002 burned 350,000 acres in one week, the Hinckley fire did the same damage in five hours. The fire created its own weather, including hurricane-strength winds, bubbles of plasma-like glowing gas, and 200-foot-tall flames. In some instances, "fire whirls," or tornadoes of fire, danced out from the main body of the fire to knock down buildings and carry flaming debris into the sky. Temperatures reached 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit--the melting point of steel. As the fire surrounded the town, two railroads became the only means of escape. Two trains ran the gauntlet of fire. One train caught on fire from one end to the other. The heroic young African-American porter ran up and down the length of the train, reassuring the passengers even as the flames tore at their clothes. On the other train, the engineer refused to back his locomotive out of town until the last possible minute of escape. In all, more than 400 people died, leading to a revolution in forestry management practices and federal agencies that monitor and fight wildfires today. Author Daniel Brown has woven together numerous survivors' stories, historical sources, and interviews with forest fire experts in a gripping narrative that tells the fascinating story of one of North America's most devastating fires and how it changed the nation.

Author Daniel Brown
Isbn 1493022016
Genre History
Year 2016-02-01
Pages 288
Language English
File format PDF

A NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER “Masterly. An epic story of four Japanese-American families and their sons who volunteered for military service and displayed uncommon heroism… Propulsive and gripping, in part because of Mr. Brown’s ability to make us care deeply about the fates of these individual soldiers...a page-turner.” – Wall Street Journal From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of The Boys in the Boat, a gripping World War II saga of patriotism and resistance, focusing on four Japanese American men and their families, and the contributions and sacrifices that they made for the sake of the nation. In the days and months after Pearl Harbor, the lives of Japanese Americans across the continent and Hawaii were changed forever. In this unforgettable chronicle of war-time America and the battlefields of Europe, Daniel James Brown portrays the journey of Rudy Tokiwa, Fred Shiosaki, and Kats Miho, who volunteered for the 442nd Regimental Combat Team and were deployed to France, Germany, and Italy, where they were asked to do the near impossible. Brown also tells the story of these soldiers' parents, immigrants who were forced to submit to life in concentration camps on U.S. soil. Woven throughout is the chronicle of Gordon Hirabayashi, one of a cadre of patriotic resisters who stood up against their government in defense of their own rights. Whether fighting on battlefields or in courtrooms, these were Americans under unprecedented strain, doing what Americans do best—striving, resisting, pushing back, rising up, standing on principle, laying down their lives, and enduring.

Author Daniel James Brown
Isbn 0525557415
Genre History
Year 2021-05-11
Pages 560
Language English
File format PDF

Summary of The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown PLEASE NOTE: This is a summary and analysis of the book and NOT the original book. Preview: The Boys in the Boat: Nine Americans and Their Epic Quest for Gold at the 1936 Berlin Olympics by Daniel James Brown, is a non-fiction account of the remarkable life story of Joe Rantz. Rantz was a determined young man who overcame personal tragedy and hardship to win a gold medal at the 1936 Olympics as a member of the US rowing team. When Joe was four, his mother, Nellie, died of throat cancer. His father, Harry, went to Canada. He sent Joe to Pennsylvania to live with his Aunt Alma while his older brother, Fred, returned to college. A year later, Fred had graduated college and married Thelma. He sent for Joe to live with him and his new wife. Joe’s father returned and built a new house in Spokane, Washington. He married Thelma’s sister, Thula, a talented violinist. Joe moved in with Harry and Thula… Inside this Instaread Summary of The Boys in the Boat • Summary of entire book• Introduction to the Important People in the book• Analysis of the Themes and Author’s Style About the Author With Instaread, you can get the summary and analysis of a book in 15 minutes. We read every chapter, summarize and analyze it for your convenience.

Author Instaread
Isbn
Genre Sports & Recreation
Year 2015-09-29
Pages 39
Language English
File format PDF

*"Rivaling the nonfiction works of Steve Sheinkin and Daniel James Brown's The Boys in the Boat....Even readers who don't appreciate sports will find this story a page-turner." --School Library Connection, starred review *"A must for all library collections." --Booklist, starred review Winner of the 2020 AJL Sydney Taylor Honor! From the New York Times bestselling author of Strong Inside comes the remarkable true story of the birth of Olympic basketball at the 1936 Summer Games in Hitler's Germany. Perfect for fans of The Boys in the Boat and Unbroken. On a scorching hot day in July 1936, thousands of people cheered as the U.S. Olympic teams boarded the S.S. Manhattan, bound for Berlin. Among the athletes were the 14 players representing the first-ever U.S. Olympic basketball team. As thousands of supporters waved American flags on the docks, it was easy to miss the one courageous man holding a BOYCOTT NAZI GERMANY sign. But it was too late for a boycott now; the ship had already left the harbor. 1936 was a turbulent time in world history. Adolf Hitler had gained power in Germany three years earlier. Jewish people and political opponents of the Nazis were the targets of vicious mistreatment, yet were unaware of the horrors that awaited them in the coming years. But the Olympians on board the S.S. Manhattan and other international visitors wouldn't see any signs of trouble in Berlin. Streets were swept, storefronts were painted, and every German citizen greeted them with a smile. Like a movie set, it was all just a facade, meant to distract from the terrible things happening behind the scenes. This is the incredible true story of basketball, from its invention by James Naismith in Springfield, Massachusetts, in 1891, to the sport's Olympic debut in Berlin and the eclectic mix of people, events and propaganda on both sides of the Atlantic that made it all possible. Includes photos throughout, a Who's-Who of the 1936 Olympics, bibliography, and index. Praise for Games of Deception: A 2020 ALA Notable Children's Book! A 2020 CBC Notable Social Studies Book! "Maraniss does a great job of blending basketball action with the horror of Hitler's Berlin to bring this fascinating, frightening, you-can't-make-this-stuff-up moment in history to life." -Steve Sheinkin, New York Times bestselling author of Bomb and Undefeated "I was blown away by Games of Deception....It's a fascinating, fast-paced, well-reasoned, and well-written account of the hidden-in-plain-sight horrors and atrocities that underpinned sports, politics, and propaganda in the United States and Germany. This is an important read." -Susan Campbell Bartoletti, Newbery Honor winning author of Hitler Youth "A richly reported and stylishly told reminder how, when you scratch at a sports story, the real world often lurks just beneath." --Alexander Wolff, New York Times bestselling author of The Audacity of Hoop: Basketball and the Age of Obama "An insightful, gripping account of basketball and bias." --Kirkus Reviews "An exciting and overlooked slice of history." --School Library Journal

Author Andrew Maraniss
Isbn 0525514643
Genre Young Adult Nonfiction
Year 2019-11-05
Pages 272
Language English
File format PDF

So much to read, so little time? This brief overview of The Boys in the Boat tells you what you need to know—before or after you read Daniel James Brown’s book. Crafted and edited with care, Worth Books set the standard for quality and give you the tools you need to be a well-informed reader. This short summary and analysis of The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown includes: Historical context Chapter-by-chapter summaries Detailed timeline of key events Profiles of the main characters Important quotes Fascinating trivia Glossary of terms Supporting material to enhance your understanding of the original work About The Boys in the Boat by Daniel James Brown: No one expected a ragtag crew team from the University of Washington to rise to the top of their sport—much less go to the Olympics in Germany. It was the 1930s, at the height of the Great Depression and the dawn of the Nazi party’s ascendance to power, and the school had never been able to beat the Ivy League teams, but coach Al Ulbrickson had big ambitions—he just needed the right athletes. Over the next few years, the boys of the UW rowing team endured grueling days of training and countless setbacks. In the end, it was their collective dedication that brought them to compete in the 1936 Olympics in Berlin—and beat the team rowing for Adolf Hitler. A New York Times bestseller and the inspiration for the PBS documentary The Boys of ’36, Daniel James Brown’s The Boys in the Boat is a celebration of the human spirit and a compelling biography of a unique rowing team that brought home Olympic gold. The summary and analysis in this ebook are intended to complement your reading experience and bring you closer to a great work of nonfiction.

Author Worth Books
Isbn 1504043081
Genre Study Aids
Year 2016-11-15
Pages 33
Language English
File format PDF

“David Laskin deploys historical fact of the finest grain to tell the story of a monstrous blizzard that caught the settlers of the Great Plains utterly by surprise. . . . This is a book best read with a fire roaring in the hearth and a blanket and box of tissues near at hand.” — Erik Larson, author of The Devil in the White City “Heartbreaking. . . . This account of the 1888 blizzard reads like a thriller.” — Entertainment Weekly The gripping true story of an epic prairie snowstorm that killed hundreds of newly arrived settlers and cast a shadow on the promise of the American frontier. January 12, 1888, began as an unseasonably warm morning across Nebraska, the Dakotas, and Minnesota, the weather so mild that children walked to school without coats and gloves. But that afternoon, without warning, the atmosphere suddenly, violently changed. One moment the air was calm; the next the sky exploded in a raging chaos of horizontal snow and hurricane-force winds. Temperatures plunged as an unprecedented cold front ripped through the center of the continent. By the next morning, some five hundred people lay dead on the drifted prairie, many of them children who had perished on their way home from country schools. In a few terrifying hours, the hopes of the pioneers had been blasted by the bitter realities of their harsh environment. Recent immigrants from Germany, Norway, Denmark, and the Ukraine learned that their free homestead was not a paradise but a hard, unforgiving place governed by natural forces they neither understood nor controlled. With the storm as its dramatic, heartbreaking focal point, The Children's Blizzard captures this pivotal moment in American history by tracing the stories of five families who were forever changed that day. David Laskin has produced a masterful portrait of a tragic crucible in the settlement of the American heartland. The P.S. edition features an extra 16 pages of insights into the book, including author interviews, recommended reading, and more.

Author David Laskin
Isbn 0061866520
Genre History
Year 2009-10-13
Pages 336
Language English
File format PDF

This book summary and analysis is created for individuals who want to extract the essential contents and are too busy to go through the full version. This book is not intended to replace the original book. Instead, we highly encourage you to buy the full version. Daniel James Brown's The Boys in the Boat tells the true story of overcoming the insuperable and achieving the improbable. Brown's story recounts the glorious triumph of the nine American boys who revealed the face of true grit to the entire world during the 1936 Berlin Olympics. The University of Washington's eight-oar rowing team composed of boys from middle-class families: sons of farmers, shipyard workers, and loggers. Victory seemed out of reach even from the beginning, but no odds ever stopped them from defeating their rivals from the East Coast, the elite from Great Britain, and even the German rowing crew representing Adolf Hitler himself. The story's sentiment revolves around Joe Rantz's personal life. Running out of prospects with no family to turn to, young Joe's motivation stems from redeeming his ruined self-esteem and discovering his true place in this world. Enthralling and truly relatable, Brown's The Boys in the Boat tells of a quest for victory and salvation. It is founded on the boys' journals as well as their personal accounts of the phenomenal feat—a narrative about the era's remarkable triumph over great odds and finding the light in the dark when all hope seems lost. Wait no more, take action and get this book now!

Author Goldmine Reads
Isbn
Genre Young Adult Fiction
Year 2017-05-27
Pages 54
Language English
File format PDF

The #1 New York Times bestseller about the Greatest Generation freshly adapted for the next generation. For readers of Unbroken, out of the depths of the Great Depression comes the astonishing tale of nine working-class boys from the American West who at the 1936 Olympics showed the world what true grit really meant. With rowers who were the sons of loggers, shipyard workers, and farmers, the University of Washington’s eight-oar crew was never expected to defeat the elite East Coast teams, yet they did, going on to shock the world by challenging the German boat rowing for Adolf Hitler. At the center of the tale is Joe Rantz, a teenager without family or prospects, whose personal quest captures the spirit of his generation—the generation that would prove in the coming years that the Nazis could not prevail over American determination and optimism. This deeply emotional yet easily accessible young readers adaptation of the award-winning #1 New York Times bestseller features never-before-seen photographs, highly visual back matter, and an exclusive new introduction.

Author Daniel James Brown
Isbn 0698197593
Genre Juvenile Nonfiction
Year 2015-09-08
Pages 240
Language English
File format PDF

Beautifully designed and carefully curated, a fascinating collection of the things that shaped the way we live and play in America What artifact best captures the spirit of American sports? The bat Babe Ruth used to hit his allegedly called shot, or the ball on which Pete Rose wrote, "I'm sorry I bet on baseball"? Could it be Lance Armstrong's red-white-and-blue bike, now tarnished by doping and hubris? Or perhaps its ancestor, the nineteenth-century safety bicycle that opened an avenue of previously unknown freedom to women? The jerseys of rivals Larry Bird and Magic Johnson? Or the handball that Abraham Lincoln threw against a wall as he waited for news of his presidential nomination? From nearly forgotten heroes like Tad Lucas (rodeo) and Tommy Kono (weightlifting) to celebrities like Amelia Earhart, Muhammad Ali, and Michael Phelps, Cait Murphy tells the stories of the people, events, and things that have forged the epic of American sports, in both its splendor and its squalor. Stories of heroism and triumph rub up against tales of discrimination and cheating. These objects tell much more than just stories about great games-they tell the story of the nation. Eye-opening and exuberant, A History of American Sports in 100 Objects shows how the games Americans play are woven into the gloriously infuriating fabric of America itself.

Author Cait Murphy
Isbn 0465097758
Genre History
Year 2016-10-11
Pages 384
Language English
File format PDF

The Berlin Olympics, August 14, 1936. German rowers, dominant at the Games, line up against America's top eight-oared crew. Hundreds of millions of listeners worldwide wait by their radios. Leni Riefenstahl prepares her cameramen. Grantland Rice looks past the 75,000 spectators crowding the riverbank. Above it all, the Nazi leadership, flush with the propaganda triumph the Olympics have given their New Germany, await a crowning victory they can broadcast to the world. The Berlin Games matched cutting-edge communication technology with compelling sports narrative to draw the blueprint for all future sports broadcasting. A global audience--the largest cohort of humanity ever assembled--enjoyed the spectacle via radio. This still-novel medium offered a "liveness," a thrilling immediacy no other technology had ever matched. Michael J. Socolow's account moves from the era's technological innovations to the human drama of how the race changed the lives of nine young men. As he shows, the origins of global sports broadcasting can be found in this single, forgotten contest. In those origins we see the ways the presentation, consumption, and uses of sport changed forever.

Author Michael J Socolow
Isbn 0252099141
Genre Sports & Recreation
Year 2016-10-14
Pages 288
Language English
File format PDF

Lives intersect in the most unexpected ways when teenagers Anne and Lewis cross paths at an estate sale in sleepy Failin, Oregon. Failin was once a thriving logging community. Now the town's businesses are crumbling, its citizens bitter and disaffected. Anne and Lewis refuse to succumb to the fate of the older generation as they discover—together—the secrets of their hometown and their own families. * From award-winning creators Sara Ryan Carla Speed McNeil (Finder)! "[Bad Houses] is the best graphic novel I've read all year. Superbly observed, exquisitely drawn, with a sharp bite and a real human pulse. Magnificent." — Warren Ellis, author of Gun Machine and Transmetropolitan

Author Sara Ryan
Isbn 1621158292
Genre Comics & Graphic Novels
Year 2013-11-12
Pages 148
Language English
File format PDF

Modern Sports around the World focuses on the history, geography, sociology, economics, and technological advancements of 50 sports played from India to Ireland. Sports have become an international spectacle that influences nations' foreign policy, world economies, and regional morale. Hundreds of billions of dollars are at stake as governments and multinational corporations rush to make sure they have a place at the table. And yet, sports come from humble beginnings. We are fascinated by who can run the fastest, lift the most weight, jump the highest, swim the farthest, and act with the most precision. The history of sports is the history of the world. Modern Sports around the World examines 50 of the world's most popular sports. Each chapter features one sport and details that sport's origins, global migration, economic forces, media influences, political environment, pop-culture inspirations, scandalous moments, and key individuals. Sports history is a tapestry of sociological variables; Modern Sports around the World weaves them together to create a unique history book that explains not only where humanity has been, but where it might be going. Provides readers with a global historical understanding of 50 of the world's most popular sports Demonstrates the many ways sports touch all of our lives, whether through economics, pop culture and entertainment, or politics Explains the ways people of the world are connected through sports, bridging economic class and geographic location Shows how sports mirror, and sometimes instigate, social progress, including the advancement of gender, race, class, and cultural issues Gives examples of ways athletes inspire people through exceptional individual and group achievements

Author David Asa Schwartz
Isbn 1440868808
Genre Sports & Recreation
Year 2021-06-30
Pages 381
Language English
File format PDF

Strategic Sport Communication, Third Edition, presents a comprehensive examination of the evolving field of sport communication. With a complete approach to the multifaceted and interrelated applications of sport communication, this text will help the reader understand modern trends and industry demands. The book’s topics align with the Common Professional Component topics outlined by the Commission on Sport Management Accreditation (COSMA). Organized into three parts for easy understanding, part I familiarizes students with the field by defining sport communication, presenting historical analysis, and providing an extensive discussion of career opportunities. Part II focuses on the elements of the Strategic Sport Communication Model (SSCM). This model details the three main components of sport communication: personal and organizational aspects of communication, mediated communication in sport, and sport communication services and support systems. Students will understand how each component plays an integral role in sport management, sport marketing, and operational goals at all levels of sport organizations. Part III examines legal aspects and critical sociological and cultural issues. Significant updates throughout the third edition capture the evolution of sport communication: A look at emerging communication platforms and modern technologies such as fantasy sports and online gambling New content covering the cutting-edge topics of customer-centric marketing, influencer marketing, the rise of digital media in integrated marketing, and the use of data analytics in marketing communication A new discussion of digital public relations tools and new examples of crises in sport, including a case study that provides a real-world example of a crisis in sport communication Learning aids—including key terms, chapter objectives, and chapter wrap-ups with review questions and individual exercises—provide for an engaging and focused learning experience. Updated for this edition, Sport Communication at Work sidebars feature industry experts applying chapter content, and Profile of a Sport Communicator sidebars highlight professional opportunities. In Strategic Sport Communication, Third Edition, students will develop a thorough understanding of the vast and varied field of sport communication. As the exciting field of sport communication continues to present new challenges, the analysis provided within this text will provide the foundational and theoretical understanding necessary for aspiring sport communication professionals to succeed.

Author Paul M. Pedersen,Pamela C. Laucella,Edward Kian,Andrea N. Geurin
Isbn 1492594504
Genre Business & Economics
Year 2020-06-23
Pages 472
Language English
File format PDF

“A vivid exploration of one man's lifelong obsession with an idea . . . Egan’s spirited biography might just bring [Curtis] the recognition that eluded him in life.” —Washington Post Edward Curtis was charismatic, handsome, a passionate mountaineer, and a famous portrait photographer, the Annie Leibovitz of his time. He moved in rarefied circles, a friend to presidents, vaudeville stars, leading thinkers. But when he was thirty-two years old, in 1900, he gave it all up to pursue his Great Idea: to capture on film the continent’s original inhabitants before the old ways disappeared. Curtis spent the next three decades documenting the stories and rituals of more than eighty North American tribes. It took tremendous perseverance—ten years alone to persuade the Hopi to allow him to observe their Snake Dance ceremony. And the undertaking changed him profoundly, from detached observer to outraged advocate. Curtis would amass more than 40,000 photographs and 10,000 audio recordings, and he is credited with making the first narrative documentary film. In the process, the charming rogue with the grade school education created the most definitive archive of the American Indian. “A darn good yarn. Egan is a muscular storyteller and his book is a rollicking page-turner with a colorfully drawn hero.” —San Francisco Chronicle “A riveting biography of an American original.” —Boston Globe

Author Timothy Egan
Isbn 0547840608
Genre History
Year 2012-10-09
Pages 352
Language English
File format PDF

This book details the lives and careers of four sports-writing greats—Grantland Rice, Red Smith, Shirley Povich, and W. C. Heinz—and the legendary athletes and events they covered for decades. These men all wrote during what is often considered sport’s Golden Age, lifting sports reporting to heights that it is unlikely to reach again.

Author Lee Congdon
Isbn 1442277521
Genre Biography & Autobiography
Year 2017-05-05
Pages 170
Language English
File format PDF

Help maximize your existing collection with this browsable volume containing titles that serve double-duty with their appeal to both teens and adults and cover genres spanning crime novels, romance, horror, science fiction, and more. • Features annotations that focus on reader appeal factors • Provides lists of titles as well as tips for using them with readers • Considers the appeal of various genres to adults and young adults • Acknowledges format availability, including various digital formats

Author Jessica E. Moyer
Isbn 144083847X
Genre Language Arts & Disciplines
Year 2016-10-31
Pages 182
Language English
File format PDF

Break free to make real change for yourself and others Have you ever felt like your progress was being blocked, not just by your own circumstances, but by the presence and actions of others? Freedom to Change releases you from the trap of constantly telling yourself that you'd be more successful at teaching, leading, or contributing to an organization if only others didn't stand in your way. In his engaging, irreverent style, bestselling author Michael Fullan explores the two kinds of freedom in our daily lives: freedom from obstacles versus freedom to take initiative and act. Gaining freedom from barriers has no value in itself until it is partnered with an equally determined sense of what you truly want. What change would you like to bring about for yourself or those around you? Given that human nature and productivity are fundamentally social, Fullan prescribes four dynamically interrelated actions we can take: Consciously seeking a balance between our own autonomy and cooperation with others Improving the feedback exchange—giving more valuable responses, as well as eliciting, hearing, and accepting feedback more effectively Building accountability to others into the fabric of our working lives Finding ways to influence others with the changes we've made and want to spread Illustrated and enriched with examples from education, business, and nonprofit sectors, Freedom to Change offers recommendations for both individuals and organizations seeking to enhance connectedness and independence.

Author Michael Fullan
Isbn 1119024374
Genre Education
Year 2015-05-08
Pages 192
Language English
File format PDF

Find flow and reach peak performance—in sports and in life. Based on the groundbreaking Still Quiet Place mindfulness program, this workbook provides practical, step-by-step exercises and skills to help you gain present-moment awareness and achieve your athletic goals. Are you looking for unique ways to "get into the game"? To enhance your training and find focus? You aren’t alone. Increasingly, athletes and coaches—from amateur leagues to professional football champs to Olympic athletes—are incorporating mindfulness practices into their training. That’s because mindfulness can help you lower your stress levels, connect with the moment, and mentally bounce back after setbacks. So whether you're a sports enthusiast or a professional athlete, mindfulness can also help you deal with physical aspects of training, such as fatigue, aches, pains, injury, burnout, and exhaustion. Written by holistic physician, mindfulness coach, and long-time athlete Amy Saltzman, this practical workbook offers mindfulness-based skills you can use any time throughout your athletic career, as well as in daily life. You’ll discover what the author fondly refers to as the “still quiet place,” and from the vantage point of that stillness, you’ll be able to observe your thoughts, feelings, and physical sensations—before and during practice and competition, between events, after a miss or significant loss, or exhilarating win. You’ll also find skills for dealing effectively with teammates and coaches, as well as skills for coaching mindfully. A parents guide is also included. No matter what sport you play, 90 percent of performance is mental. With this workbook as your guide, you can use mindfulness to enhance your training, competitive performance, and your life beyond athletics.

Author Amy Saltzman
Isbn 1684030226
Genre Sports & Recreation
Year 2018-03-01
Pages 256
Language English
File format PDF