Human life is susceptible of changing suddenly, of shifting inadvertently, of appearing differently, of varying unpredictably, of being altered deliberately, of advancing fortuitously, of commencing or ending accidentally, of a certain malleability. In theory, any human being is potentially capacitated to conceive of—and convey—the chance, view, or fact that matters may be otherwise, or not at all; with respect to other lifeforms, this might be said animal’s distinctive characteristic. This state of play is both an everyday phenomenon, and an indispensable prerequisite for exceptional innovations in culture and science: contingency is the condition of possibility for any of the arts—be they dominantly concerned with thinking, crafting, or enacting. While their scope and method may differ, the (f)act of reckoning with—and taking advantage of—contingency renders rhetoricians and philosophers associates after all. In this regard, Aristotle and Blumenberg will be exemplary, hence provide the framework. Between these diachronic bridgeheads, close readings applying the nexus of rhetoric and contingency to a selection of (Early) Modern texts and authors are intercalated—among them La Celestina, Machiavelli, Shakespeare, Wilde, Fontane.

Author ,
Isbn 3110701650
Genre Literary Criticism
Year 2020-10-26
Pages 899
Language English
File format PDF

This handbook sets out the processes and products of 'digital' research. It is a theoretical and practical guide on how to undertake and navigate advanced research in the arts, humanities and social sciences. Topics covered include: - how to make research more accessible - the use of search engines and other sources to determine the scope of work - research training for students - what will theses, dissertations and research reports look like in ten years' time? - the storing and archiving of such research - ethics and methodologies in the field - intercultural issues The editors focus on advances in arts and practice-based doctorates, and their application in other fields and disciplines. The contributions chart new territory for universities, research project directors, supervisors and research students regarding the nature and format of Masters and doctoral work, as well as research projects. This handbook is an essential reference for researchers, supervisors and administrators on how to conduct and evaluate research projects in a digital and multimodal age. Richard Andrews is Professor in English, Faculty of Children and Learning, Institute of Education. Erik Borg is a Senior Lecturer at Coventry University's Centre for Academic Writing. Stephen Boyd Davis is Research Leader in the School of Design, Royal College of Art. Myrrh Domingo is Visiting Assistant Professor in English Education and Literacy Education at New York University. Jude England is Head of Social Sciences at the British Library.

Author Richard Andrews,Erik Borg,Stephen Boyd Davis,Myrrh Domingo,Jude England
Isbn 1446265587
Genre Reference
Year 2012-06-22
Pages 548
Language English
File format PDF

This comprehensive, annotated, multivolume bibliography is a record of all printed works touching on some aspect of the political, religious, cultural, or social history of the Hawaiian Islands-from the first printed notice mentioning the Islands (in a German periodical of January 1780) to the beginning of the twentieth century, when the Islands ceased to be a separate political entity. Volume I covers the period from 1780 to 1830, when exploratory voyages to the northern Pacific had largely concluded and the arrival of improved printing equipment in the Islands resulted in a substantial increase in the number of works printed by the Mission Press in Honolulu. In addition to books and pamphlets, the bibliography includes newspaper and periodical accounts and single sheet publications such as broadsides, circulars, playbills, and handbills because they often contain the only eyewitness or contemporary description of an important event or individual. Entries pertaining to Captain Cook's Third Voyage dominate the first twenty years of the bibliography. They reflect the profound impact of the voyage on both the Hawaiian culture and on nineteenth-century European thought. Extensive annotations provide a brief summary of approximately 760 published works in the first volume of the bibliography. All known editions of each work are listed, together with the exact title, date of publication, size of the volume, collation of pages, number and type of plates and maps, references, and location of copies. The bibliography will be invaluable to scholars, librarians, rare book sellers, and book collectors within the field of Hawaiiana.

Author David W. Forbes
Isbn 0824862791
Genre Reference
Year 1999-02-01
Pages 552
Language English
File format PDF

The Narrative Turn in Fiction and Theory explores the philosophical and historical underpinnings of the postwar crisis and return of storytelling and shows their relevance for the ongoing debate on the significance of narrative for human existence.

Author H. Meretoja
Isbn 1137401060
Genre Literary Criticism
Year 2014-10-06
Pages 282
Language English
File format PDF

Essays by eleven prominent scholars provide the latest insights into the seventeenth-century history of the Hudson Valley and its environs. This book provides an in-depth introduction to the issues involved in the expansion of European interests to the Hudson River Valley, the cultural interaction that took place there, and the colonization of the region. Written in accessible language by leading scholars, these essays incorporate the latest historical insights as they explore the new world in which American Indians and Europeans interacted, the settlement of the Dutch colony that ensued from the exploration of the Hudson River, and the development of imperial and other networks which came to incorporate the Hudson Valley. “This well-conceived volume illuminates the various contexts of life in the seventeenth-century Hudson Valley. Both laymen and specialists will gain new insights from the twelve essays, which reveal everything from the European background of tolerance and inter-imperial strife to the significance of wampum and the role of a Native model of inter-group relations that shaped Iroquois ties with the Dutch.” — Willem Klooster, author of Revolutions in the Atlantic World: A Comparative History “A perfect tribute to the Hudson Valley’s unique history and how it changed forever in the decades following Henry Hudson’s 1609 voyage! The essays in this rich collection capture the complex, interconnected world experienced by those who lived in the Hudson River Valley in the seventeenth century, a place at the crossroads of four continents, an area contested by three emerging empires, a valley where Munsee, Mahican, and Mohawk interacted with European cultures. Both professional historians and those new to the field will be intrigued by the wide variety of topics. This collection by an esteemed group of historians makes an outstanding contribution to both New Netherland and Atlantic history.” — Dennis J. Maika, New Netherland Institute

Author Jaap Jacobs,L. H. Roper
Isbn 1438450990
Genre History
Year 2014-05-15
Pages 278
Language English
File format PDF

"Told brilliantly, even unforgettably ... An American story, one that belongs to all of us." — Boston Globe “A richly textured guide to the history of our immigrant nation’s pinnacle immigrant city has managed to enter the stage during an election season that has resurrected this historically fraught topic in all its fierceness.” — New York Times Book Review New York has been America’s city of immigrants for nearly four centuries. Growing from Peter Minuit’s tiny settlement of 1626 to a clamorous metropolis with more than three million immigrants today, the city has always been a magnet for transplants from all over the globe. City of Dreams is the long-overdue, inspiring, and defining account of New York’s immigrants, both famous and forgotten: the young man from the Caribbean who relocated to New York and became a founding father; Russian-born Emma Goldman, who condoned the murder of American industrialists as a means of aiding downtrodden workers; Dominican immigrant Oscar de la Renta, who dressed first ladies from Jackie Kennedy to Michelle Obama. Over ten years in the making, Tyler Anbinder’s story is one of innovators and artists, revolutionaries and rioters, staggering deprivation and soaring triumphs. In so many ways, today’s immigrants are just like those who came to America in centuries past—and their stories have never before been told with such breadth of scope, lavish research, and resounding spirit. “A masterful achievement, City of Dreams is the definitive account of the American origin story, as told through our premier metropolis. Bold, exhaustive, always surprising, Anbinder’s book is a wonderful reminder of how we came to be who we are.” — Timothy Egan, best-selling author of The Immortal Irishman

Author Tyler Anbinder
Isbn 0544103858
Genre History
Year 2016-10-18
Pages 768
Language English
File format PDF

In this ambitious first volume of her exhaustive 1909 account of New York City's early history, Van Rensselaer begins with the earliest Dutch settlements and the founding of New Amsterdam. Using many primary sources to examine how trade, geography, and politics shaped the island's growth and fortunes, she takes us through the long governorship of Peter Stuyvesant and his eventual surrender of New Amsterdam to the English in 1664, which resulted in the city's new name. This is a fascinating and detailed account, perfect for students, historians, and anyone interested in pre-Revolutionary New York. Devoted to the study of art and architecture, American author MARIANA GRISWOLD VAN RENSSELAER (1851-1934) was born in New York City and was an honorary member of the American Institute of Architects. In a rare accomplishment for a woman at the time, she received a doctorate of literature from Columbia University in 1910. Her other books include English Cathedrals, Art Out of Doors, and One Man Who Was Content.

Author Mariana Griswold Van Rensselaer
Isbn 1602063524
Genre History
Year 2007-04
Pages 568
Language English
File format PDF

In a riveting, groundbreaking narrative, Russell Shorto tells the story of New Netherland, the Dutch colony which pre-dated the Pilgrims and established ideals of tolerance and individual rights that shaped American history. "Astonishing . . . A book that will permanently alter the way we regard our collective past." --The New York Times When the British wrested New Amsterdam from the Dutch in 1664, the truth about its thriving, polyglot society began to disappear into myths about an island purchased for 24 dollars and a cartoonish peg-legged governor. But the story of the Dutch colony of New Netherland was merely lost, not destroyed: 12,000 pages of its records–recently declared a national treasure–are now being translated. Russell Shorto draws on this remarkable archive in The Island at the Center of the World, which has been hailed by The New York Times as “a book that will permanently alter the way we regard our collective past.” The Dutch colony pre-dated the “original” thirteen colonies, yet it seems strikingly familiar. Its capital was cosmopolitan and multi-ethnic, and its citizens valued free trade, individual rights, and religious freedom. Their champion was a progressive, young lawyer named Adriaen van der Donck, who emerges in these pages as a forgotten American patriot and whose political vision brought him into conflict with Peter Stuyvesant, the autocratic director of the Dutch colony. The struggle between these two strong-willed men laid the foundation for New York City and helped shape American culture. The Island at the Center of the World uncovers a lost world and offers a surprising new perspective on our own.

Author Russell Shorto
Isbn 1400096332
Genre History
Year 2005-04-12
Pages 416
Language English
File format PDF

To European explorers, it was Eden, a paradise of waist-high grasses, towering stands of walnut, maple, chestnut, and oak, and forests that teemed with bears, wolves, raccoons, beavers, otters, and foxes. Today, it is the site of Broadway and Wall Street, the Empire State Building and the Statue of Liberty, and the home of millions of people, who have come from every corner of the nation and the globe. In Gotham, Edwin G. Burrows and Mike Wallace have produced a monumental work of history, one that ranges from the Indian tribes that settled in and around the island of Manna-hata, to the consolidation of the five boroughs into Greater New York in 1898. It is an epic narrative, a story as vast and as varied as the city it chronicles, and it underscores that the history of New York is the story of our nation. Readers will relive the tumultuous early years of New Amsterdam under the Dutch West India Company, Peter Stuyvesant's despotic regime, Indian wars, slave resistance and revolt, the Revolutionary War and the defeat of Washington's army on Brooklyn Heights, the destructive seven years of British occupation, New York as the nation's first capital, the duel between Aaron Burr and Alexander Hamilton, the Erie Canal and the coming of the railroads, the growth of the city as a port and financial center, the infamous draft riots of the Civil War, the great flood of immigrants, the rise of mass entertainment such as vaudeville and Coney Island, the building of the Brooklyn Bridge and the birth of the skyscraper. Here too is a cast of thousands--the rebel Jacob Leisler and the reformer Joanna Bethune; Clement Moore, who saved Greenwich Village from the city's street-grid plan; Herman Melville, who painted disillusioned portraits of city life; and Walt Whitman, who happily celebrated that same life. We meet the rebel Jacob Leisler and the reformer Joanna Bethune; Boss Tweed and his nemesis, cartoonist Thomas Nast; Emma Goldman and Nellie Bly; Jacob Riis and Horace Greeley; police commissioner Theodore Roosevelt; Colonel Waring and his "white angels" (who revolutionized the sanitation department); millionaires John Jacob Astor, Cornelius Vanderbilt, August Belmont, and William Randolph Hearst; and hundreds more who left their mark on this great city. The events and people who crowd these pages guarantee that this is no mere local history. It is in fact a portrait of the heart and soul of America, and a book that will mesmerize everyone interested in the peaks and valleys of American life as found in the greatest city on earth. Gotham is a dazzling read, a fast-paced, brilliant narrative that carries the reader along as it threads hundreds of stories into one great blockbuster of a book.

Author Edwin G. Burrows,Mike Wallace
Isbn 0199729107
Genre History
Year 1998-11-19
Pages 1416
Language English
File format PDF

How much do you actually know about New York City? Did you know they tried to anchor Zeppelins at the top of the Empire State Building? Or that the high-rent district of Park Avenue was once so dangerous it was called "Death Avenue"? Lively and comprehensive, Inside the Apple brings to life New York's fascinating past. This narrative history of New York City is the first to offer practical walking tour know-how. Fast-paced but thorough, its bite-size chapters each focus on an event, person, or place of historical significance. Rich in anecdotes and illustrations, it whisks readers from colonial New Amsterdam through Manhattan's past, right up to post-9/11 New York. The book also works as a historical walking-tour guide, with 14 self-guided tours, maps, and step-by-step directions. Easy to carry with you as you explore the city, Inside the Apple allows you to visit the site of every story it tells. This energetic, wide-ranging, and often humorous book covers New York's most important historical moments, but is always anchored in the city of today.

Author Michelle Nevius,James Nevius
Isbn 1416593934
Genre History
Year 2009-03-24
Pages 368
Language English
File format PDF

Using the borderscapes concept, this book offers an approach to border studies that expresses the multilevel complexity of borders, from the geopolitical to social practice and cultural production at and across the border. Accordingly, it encourages a productive understanding of the processual, de-territorialized and dispersed nature of borders and their ensuring regimes in the era of globalization and transnational flows as well as showcasing border research as an interdisciplinary field with its own academic standing. Contemporary bordering processes and practices are examined through the borderscapes lens to uncover important connections between borders as a ‘challenge' to national (and EU) policies and borders as potential elements of political innovation through conceptual (re-)framings of social, political, economic and cultural spaces. The authors offer a nuanced and critical re-reading and understanding of the border not as an entity to be taken for granted, but as a place of investigation and as a resource in terms of the construction of novel (geo)political imaginations, social and spatial imaginaries and cultural images. In so doing, they suggest that rethinking borders means deconstructing the interweaving between political practices of inclusion-exclusion and the images created to support and communicate them on the cultural level by Western territorialist modernity. The result is a book that proposes a wandering through a constellation of bordering policies, discourses, practices and images to open new possibilities for thinking, mapping, acting and living borders under contemporary globalization.

Author Dr Chiara Brambilla,Dr Jussi Laine,Professor Gianluca Bocchi,Professor James W. Scott
Isbn 1472451481
Genre Social Science
Year 2015-12-28
Pages 278
Language English
File format PDF

Read any history of New York City and you will read about men. You will read about men who were political leaders and men who were activists and cultural tastemakers. These men have been lauded for generations for creating the most exciting and influential city in the world. But that's not the whole story. The Women Who Made New York reveals the untold stories of the phenomenal women who made New York City the cultural epicenter of the world. Many were revolutionaries and activists, like Zora Neale Hurston and Audre Lorde. Others were icons and iconoclasts, like Fran Lebowitz and Grace Jones. There were also women who led quieter private lives but were just as influential, such as Emily Warren Roebling, who completed the construction of the Brooklyn Bridge when her engineer husband became too ill to work. Paired with striking, contemporary illustrations by artist Hallie Heald, The Women Who Made New York offers a visual sensation--one that reinvigorates not just New York City's history but its very identity.

Author Julie Scelfo
Isbn 1580056547
Genre History
Year 2016-11-15
Pages 256
Language English
File format PDF

Here are the best of things to see and do, places to eat, drink, and shop, and where to take the kids in the greatest city on earth. Divided by area, each with its own map, this easy-to-use guide to Manhattan gives expert advice on everything not to be missed. Those new to the city (and those who are not) need this book! Newly revised for 2008. 200 pages, plus 8 foldout maps.

Author Ben Gibbard
Isbn 9781593598907
Genre Travel
Year 2007-09
Pages 210
Language English
File format PDF

It is the contention of the editors and contributors of this volume that the work carried out by Gilles Deleuze, where rigorously applied, has the potential to cut through much of the intellectual sedimentation that has settled in the fields of music studies. Deleuze is a vigorous critic of the Western intellectual tradition, calling for a 'philosophy of difference', and, despite its ambitions, he is convinced that Western philosophy fails to truly grasp (or think) difference as such. It is argued that longstanding methods of conceptualizing music are vulnerable to Deleuze's critique. But, as Deleuze himself stresses, more important than merely critiquing established paradigms is developing ways to overcome them, and by using Deleuze's own concepts this collection aims to explore that possibility.

Author Nick Nesbitt
Isbn 1317052455
Genre Music
Year 2016-04-01
Pages 312
Language English
File format PDF

The first volume of Paths to Contemporary French Literature offered a critical panorama of over fifty French writers and poets. With this second volume, John Tayloran American writer and critic who has lived in France for the past thirty yearscontinues this ambitious and critically acclaimed project.Praised for his independence, curiosity, intimate knowledge of European literature, and his sharp reader's eye, John Taylor is a writer-critic who is naturally skeptical of literary fashions, overnight reputations, and readymade academic categories. Charting the paths that have lead to the most serious and stimulating contemporary French writing, he casts light on several neglected postwar French authors, all the while highlighting genuine mentors and invigorating newcomers. Some names (Patrick Chamoiseau, Pascal Quignard, Jean-Philippe Toussaint, Jean Rouaud, Francis Ponge, Aime Cesaire, Marguerite Yourcenar, J. M. G. Le Clezio) may be familiar to the discriminating and inquisitive American reader, but their work is incisively re-evaluated here. The book also includes a moving remembrance of Nathalie Sarraute, and an evocation of the author's meetings with Julien Gracq Other writers in this second volume are equally deserving authors whose work is highly respected by their peers in France yet little known in English-speaking countries. Taylor's pioneering elucidations in this respect are particularly valuable.This second volume also examines a number of non-French, originally non-French-speaking writers (such as Gherasim Luca, Petr Kral, Armen Lubin, Venus Ghoura-Khata, Piotr Rawicz, as well as Samuel Beckett) who chose French as their literary idiom. Taylor is in a perfect position to understand their motivations, struggles, and goals. In a day and age when so little is known in English-speaking countries about foreign literature, and when so little is translated, the two volumes of Paths to Contemporary French Literature are absorb

Author John Taylor
Isbn 1351500597
Genre Literary Criticism
Year 2017-07-05
Pages 382
Language English
File format PDF

This book examines Gilles Deleuze's ideas about creativity in the context of lifelong learning, offering an original take on this important contemporary topic using cinematic parallels. Discussing Deleuze's difficult notion of 'counter-actualization' as a form of creative practice, it draws practical consequences for those across a diverse sector.

Author C. Beighton
Isbn 1137480807
Genre Philosophy
Year 2015-03-04
Pages 191
Language English
File format PDF

ISBN 9042003375 (paperback) NLG 55.00 From the contents: Beckettissimo: Beckett virtuose de l'echo: 'fin de partie' et l'essence du bouddhisme (Emmanuel Jacquart).- Staging of institutional tensions in Beckett's plays (Juergen Siess).- Postmodern staging of 'waiting for Godot' (Mariko Hori Tanaka).- Staging himself, or Beckett's late style in the theatre (S.E. Gontarski). figure.

Author Marius Buning,Matthijs Engelberts,Sjef Houppermans,Emmanuel C. Jacquart
Isbn 9789042003477
Genre Social Science
Year 1997
Pages 412
Language English
File format PDF

Washington Post "10 Best Graphic Novels of the Year" New York Magazine "The Year's Most Giftable Coffee Table Books" Newsday "Best Fall Books" The Verge "The Ten Best Comics of the Year" An Indie Next Pick Winner of the New York City Book Award From the #1 NYT bestselling author of Can't We Talk About Something More Pleasant?, Roz Chast, an "absolutely laugh-out-loud hysterical" (AP) illustrated ode/guide/thank-you to Manhattan. New Yorker cartoonist and NYT bestselling author Roz Chast, native Brooklynite-turned-suburban commuter deemed the quintessential New Yorker, has always been intensely alive to the glorious spectacle that is Manhattan--the daily clash of sidewalk racers and dawdlers; the fascinating range of dress codes; and the priceless, nutty outbursts of souls from all walks of life. For Chast, adjusting to life outside the city was surreal--(you can own trees!? you have to drive!?)--but she recognized that the reverse was true for her kids. On trips into town, they would marvel at the strange visual world of Manhattan--its blackened sidewalk gum-wads, "those West Side Story-things" (fire escapes)--and its crazily honeycombed systems and grids. Told through Chast's singularly zany, laugh-out-loud, touching, and true cartoons, Going Into Town is part New York stories (the "overheard and overseen" of the island borough), part personal and practical guide to walking, talking, renting, and venting--an irresistible, one-of-a-kind love letter to the city.

Author Roz Chast
Isbn 1632869780
Genre Comics & Graphic Novels
Year 2017-10-03
Pages 176
Language English
File format PDF

From Beckett to Burroughs, The Story of O to The Autobiography of Malcolm X, an iconic literary troublemaker tells the colorful stories behind the stories Richard Seaver came to Paris in 1950 seeking Hemingway's moveable feast. Paris had become a different city, traumatized by World War II, yet the red wine still flowed, the cafés bustled, and the Parisian women found American men exotic and heroic. There was an Irishman in Paris writing plays and novels unlike anything anyone had ever read—but hardly anyone was reading them. There were others, too, doing equivalently groundbreaking work for equivalently small audiences. So when his friends launched a literary magazine, Merlin, Seaver knew this was his calling: to bring the work of the likes of Samuel Beckett, Eugene Ionesco, and Jean Genet to the world. The Korean War ended all that—the navy had paid for college and it was time to pay them back. After two years at sea, Seaver washed ashore in New York City with a beautiful French wife and a wider sense of the world than his compatriots. The only young literary man with the audacity to match Seaver's own was Barney Rosset of Grove Press. A remarkable partnership was born, one that would demolish U.S. censorship laws with inimitable joie de vivre as Seaver and Rosset introduced American readers to Lady Chatterly's Lover, Henry Miller, Story of O, William Burroughs, The Autobiography of Malcolm X, and more. As publishing hurtles into its uncertain future, The Tender Hour of Twilight is a stirring reminder of the passion, the vitality, and even the glamour of a true life in literature.

Author Richard Seaver
Isbn 1429949899
Genre Biography & Autobiography
Year 2012-01-03
Pages 480
Language English
File format PDF