Rising out of the prairie, the Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming had long been rumored to have promising quantities of gold. Sacred to the Lakota, the Black Hills was part of the land reserved for them in the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868. However, the tide of prospectors seeking their fortune in the Black Hills was difficult to stem. Members of the 1874 Custer expedition, lead by Gen. George Armstrong Custer, found gold. In 1875, scientists Henry Newton and Walter Jenney conducted an expedition and confirmed the rumors. By 1876, the trickle of prospectors and settlers coming to the Black Hills was a flood. The US government realized that keeping the interlopers out was impossible, and in 1877 the Black Hills was officially opened to settlement. In this sequel to their Black Hills Gold Rush Towns book, the authors expand their coverage of Black Hills towns during the gold-rush era.

Author ,
Isbn 1439651299
Genre Photography
Year 2015-05-11
Pages 128
Language English
File format PDF

In 1875, a young man from Pennsylvania known as Captain Jack joined the Dodge Expedition into the Black Hills of Dakota Territory, penning letters to the Omaha Daily Bee during that time and for six months in 1876. John Wallace Crawford, aka Captain Jack, wrote a vibrant account of this fascinating time in the American West. His correspondence featured unusual and intriguing details about the relative merits of the gulches, the vagaries and difficulties of travel in the region, the art of survival in what was essentially wilderness, the hardships of inclement weather, trouble with outlaws, and interactions with American Indians. Award-winning historian Paul L. Hedren has compiled these almost unknown letters, writing an introduction and essays, which result in a treasure trove of hitherto hidden primary documents as well as a ripping yarn in the traditions of the old West. Book jacket.

Author Jack Crawford,Paul L. Hedren
Isbn 0985281782
Genre History
Year 2012
Pages 297
Language English
File format PDF

Once vital to fire prevention and detection, most of the Black Hills National Forest historic lookout towers now serve primarily as hiking destinations. The first crude lookout structures were built at Custer Peak and Harney Peak in 1911. Since that time, more than 20 towers have been constructed in the area. The first lookout towers were built of wood, most replaced by steel or stone. The Civilian Conservation Corps was instrumental in constructing fire towers during the 1930s and 1940s. One of the most famous and architecturally and aesthetically valued towers is the Harney Peak Fire Lookout—situated on the highest point east of the Rocky Mountains. Harney Peak is among a number of Black Hills towers listed on the National Historic Lookout Register. Over 200 vintage images tell the story of not only the historic fire towers but those who manned them. Perched atop high peaks in remote locations, fire lookout personnel spent countless hours scanning the forest, pinpointing dangers, often experiencing the powerful wrath of lightning strong enough to jolt them off their lightning stools.

Author Jan Cerney,Roberta Sago
Isbn 1439625727
Genre Nature
Year 2011-05-09
Pages 128
Language English
File format PDF

Your Travel Destination. Your Home. Your Home-To-Be. South Dakota’s Black Hills & Badlands Ghost towns and modern towns. Trendy eateries and rustic bars. Cowboys and artists. Rodeos, skiing, hiking, and biking. Breathtaking landscapes in a place of welcoming smiles. • A personal, practical perspective for travelers and residents alike • Comprehensive listings of attractions, restaurants, and accommodations • How to live & thrive in the area—from recreation to relocation • Countless details on shopping, arts & entertainment, and children’s activities

Author T. D. Griffith,Nyla Griffith
Isbn 0762774827
Genre Travel
Year 2011-03-15
Pages 368
Language English
File format PDF

Much of Seth Bullock's modern renown comes from television, motion pictures, and his friendship with President Theodore Roosevelt. But Bullock was much more than the frontier law enforcer portrayed in fictional accounts. In Seth Bullock: Black Hills Lawman, David Wolff examines the life work of Bullock as he helped build Deadwood, found the town of Belle Fourche, and promote the Black Hills. Wolff explores the many ventures that Bullock delved into once he moved from Montana to the Black Hills at the start of the gold rush in 1876. He points out that Bullock quickly became an integral part of the burgeoning community, attempting to create a lasting legacy for himself by working within local and regional politics, through his various businesses, and in his many positions at the forefront of Black Hills law enforcement and forest management. Bullock's life epitomized that of many entrepreneurs and pioneers across the nation, and Wolff describes the struggles and successes that this thinker and dreamer experienced in his forty-three years in the Black Hills. Seth Bullock: Black Hills Lawman is the third book in the South Dakota Biography Series, which highlights some of the state's most famous residents.

Author David A. Wolff
Isbn 0979894050
Genre Biography & Autobiography
Year 2009
Pages 206
Language English
File format PDF

A NEW YORK TIMES NOTABLE BOOK OF THE YEAR A WASHINGTON POST NOTABLE BOOK OF THE YEAR ONE OF BARACK OBAMA'S FAVORITE BOOKS OF THE YEAR ONE OF NPR'S BEST BOOKS OF 2020 LONGLISTED FOR THE 2020 BOOKER PRIZE FINALIST FOR THE 2020 CENTER FOR FICTION FIRST NOVEL PRIZE WINNER OF THE ROSENTHAL FAMILY FOUNDATION AWARD, FROM THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF ARTS AND LETTERS A NATIONAL BOOK FOUNDATION "5 UNDER 35" HONOREE NATIONAL BESTSELLER “Belongs on a shelf all of its own.” —NPR “Outstanding.” —The Washington Post “Revolutionary . . . A visionary addition to American literature.” —Star Tribune An electric debut novel set against the twilight of the American gold rush, two siblings are on the run in an unforgiving landscape—trying not just to survive but to find a home. Ba dies in the night; Ma is already gone. Newly orphaned children of immigrants, Lucy and Sam are suddenly alone in a land that refutes their existence. Fleeing the threats of their western mining town, they set off to bury their father in the only way that will set them free from their past. Along the way, they encounter giant buffalo bones, tiger paw prints, and the specters of a ravaged landscape as well as family secrets, sibling rivalry, and glimpses of a different kind of future. Both epic and intimate, blending Chinese symbolism and reimagined history with fiercely original language and storytelling, How Much of These Hills Is Gold is a haunting adventure story, an unforgettable sibling story, and the announcement of a stunning new voice in literature. On a broad level, it explores race in an expanding country and the question of where immigrants are allowed to belong. But page by page, it’s about the memories that bind and divide families, and the yearning for home.

Author C Pam Zhang
Isbn 0525537228
Genre Fiction
Year 2020-04-07
Pages 288
Language English
File format PDF

A historian separates facts from myths to search for the real woman behind the Western legend. The mere mention of Calamity Jane conjures up images of buckskins, bull whips, and dance halls, but there’s more to the woman than what’s been portrayed in dime novels and countless books, films, and TV shows. Born Martha Canary, she was orphaned as a child and assumed the responsibility of caring for her siblings. Much too young and ambitious to rear a family, she found homes for all. After setting off on her own, Martha tried to reconnect with her fractured family in her typical haphazard fashion, all the while transforming into Calamity Jane. Soon, her own foibles and her siblings’ choices rendered the attempt futile. From her brother Elijah’s horse thieving to her sister Lena’s denial of Martha’s tales, author Jan Cerney uncovers the tumultuous Canary family relationships often overlooked in the Calamity canon.

Author Jan Cerney
Isbn 1625856911
Genre History
Year 2016-06-20
Pages 163
Language English
File format PDF

For most of the twentieth century tin was fundamental for both warfare and welfare. The importance of tin is most powerfully represented by the tin can - an invention which created a revolution in food preservation and helped feed both the armies of the great powers and the masses of the new urban society. The trouble with tin was that economically viable deposits of the metal could only be found in a few regions of the world, predominantly in the southern hemisphere, while the main centers of consumption were in the industrialized north. The tin trade was therefore a highly politically charged economy in which states and private enterprise competed and cooperated to assert control over deposits, smelters and markets. Tin provides a particularly telling illustration of how the interactions of business and governments shape the evolution of the global economic trade; the tin industry has experienced extensive state intervention during times of war, encompasses intense competition and cartelization, and has seen industry centers both thrive and fail in the wake of decolonization. The history of the international tin industry reveals the complex interactions and interdependencies between local actors and international networks, decolonization and globalization, as well as government foreign policies and entrepreneurial tactics. By highlighting the global struggles for control and the constantly shifting economic, geographical and political constellations within one specific industry, this collection of essays brings the state back into business history, and the firm into the history of international relations.

Author Mats Ingulstad,Andrew Perchard,Espen Storli
Isbn 1317816110
Genre Business & Economics
Year 2014-09-04
Pages 278
Language English
File format PDF

The true life histories of Wild Bill Hickok, Calamity Jane, and other residents of the lawless town known as Deadwood—the inspiration for the award-winning HBO® series and film. With a cast of historically rich characters, The Real Deadwood explores the lives of Wild Bill Hickok, Al Swearengen, Seth Bullock, Calamity Jane, Sol Star, and a host of others who walked the streets of Deadwood. An historical crossroad of the American west, even Wyatt Earp came to Deadwood, only to bump heads with Sheriff Seth Bullock. Other celebrated visitors over the years include Buffalo Bill Cody, the Sundance Kid, Bat Masterson, and Teddy Roosevelt. Looking at the world of primitive medicine, prostitution, and law from lawlessness, The Real Deadwood separates the facts from the fiction in its overview of a town violent enough to rival the likes of Tombstone, Dodge City, and Abilene. This is the true story of life on the frontier—when roughing it was truly rough. It's good versus evil and civilization versus anarchy. It's the real Deadwood.

Author John Edwards Ames
Isbn 1101078111
Genre History
Year 2004-08-31
Pages 176
Language English
File format PDF

An anthology of the most captivating writings about the wildest town in the West, including excerpts from novels, period newspaper articles, biographies and even song lyrics.

Author T. D. Griffith
Isbn 1461747546
Genre History
Year 2009-12-08
Pages 256
Language English
File format PDF

George Crook was one of the most prominent military figures of the late-nineteenth-century Indian Wars. Yet today his name is largely unrecognized despite the important role he played in such pivotal events in western history as the Custer fight at the Little Big Horn, the death of Crazy Horse, and the Geronimo campaigns. As Paul Magid portrays Crook in this highly readable second volume of a projected three-volume biography, the general was an innovative and eccentric soldier, with a complex and often contradictory personality, whose activities often generated intense controversy. Though known for his uncompromising ferocity in battle, he nevertheless respected his enemies and grew to know and feel compassion for them. Describing campaigns against the Paiutes, Apaches, Sioux, and Cheyennes, Magid’s vivid narrative explores Crook’s abilities as an Indian fighter. The Apaches, among the fiercest peoples in the West, called Crook the Gray Fox after an animal viewed in their culture as a herald of impending death. Generals Grant and Sherman both regarded him as indispensable to their efforts to subjugate the western tribes. Though noted for his aggressiveness in combat, Crook was a reticent officer who rarely raised his voice, habitually dressed in shabby civilian attire, and often rode a mule in the field. He was also self-confident to the point of arrogance, harbored fierce grudges, and because he marched to his own beat, got along poorly with his superiors. He had many enduring friendships both in- and outside the army, though he divulged little of his inner self to others and some of his closest comrades knew he could be cold and insensitive. As Magid relates these crucial episodes of Crook’s life, a dominant contradiction emerges: while he was an unforgiving warrior in the field, he not infrequently risked his career to do battle with his military superiors and with politicians in Washington to obtain fair treatment for the very people against whom he fought. Upon hearing of the general’s death in 1890, Chief Red Cloud spoke for his Sioux people: “He, at least, never lied to us. His words gave the people hope.”

Author Paul Magid
Isbn 0806149507
Genre Biography & Autobiography
Year 2015-04-23
Pages 512
Language English
File format PDF

On the morning of January 24, 1848, James W. Marshall discovered gold in California. The news spread across the continent, launching hundreds of ships and hitching a thousand prairie schooners filled with adventurers in search of heretofore unimagined wealth. Those who joined the procession—soon called 49ers—included the wealthy and the poor from every state and territory, including slaves brought by their owners. In numbers, they represented the greatest mass migration in the history of the Republic. In this first comprehensive history of the Gold Rush, Malcolm J. Rohrbough demonstrates that in its far-reaching repercussions, it was the most significant event in the first half of the nineteenth century. No other series of events between the Louisiana Purchase and the Civil War produced such a vast movement of people; called into question basic values of marriage, family, work, wealth, and leisure; led to so many varied consequences; and left such vivid memories among its participants. Through extensive research in diaries, letters, and other archival sources, Rohrbough uncovers the personal dilemmas and confusion that the Gold Rush brought. His engaging narrative depicts the complexity of human motivation behind the event and reveals the effects of the Gold Rush as it spread outward in ever-widening circles to touch the lives of families and communities everywhere in the United States. For those who joined the 49ers, the decision to go raised questions about marital obligations and family responsibilities. For those men—and women, whose experiences of being left behind have been largely ignored until now—who remained on the farm or in the shop, the absences of tens of thousands of men over a period of years had a profound impact, reshaping a thousand communities across the breadth of the American nation.

Author Malcolm J. Rohrbough
Isbn 9780520922075
Genre History
Year 1997-04-30
Pages 569
Language English
File format PDF

From Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado to the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve in Kansas, this volume provides a snapshot of the most spectacular and important natural places in the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains. • Illustrations depict 50 of the most treasured landscapes in the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains

Author Kelly Enright
Isbn 0313353158
Genre Nature
Year 2009-11-25
Pages 172
Language English
File format PDF

This timely set invites readers to celebrate the most beautiful and environmentally important places in the United States. • Covers one region per volume with entries organized by state within the volume • 200 illustrations depict America's most treasured landscapes

Author Stacy S. Kowtko
Isbn 0313350892
Genre Nature
Year 2009-11-25
Pages 908
Language English
File format PDF

Incorporating the latest available population and economic data, this thoroughly updated edition includes; reflections on new developments, such as resource schemes, Native governments in Atlantic Canada, and the role of climate change in the Arctic; a new section focused on the US Pacific insular territories west of Hawaii; evolving views of oil and gas production resulting from the introduction of hydraulic fracturing; revised text and maps involving agricultural production based on the 2017 Census of Agriculture; current place names; more than 130 photographsThe most extensive regional geography of the North American continent on the market, Hudson's Across This Land will continue as the standard text in geography courses dealing with Canada and the United States, as well as a popular reference work for scholars, students, and lay readers.

Author John C. Hudson
Isbn 1421437597
Genre Architecture
Year 2020-02-11
Pages 520
Language English
File format PDF

Nevada County is webbed with some of the richest veins of goldbearing quartz in the world. First discovered in 1849 as placer gold washed into creek beds, hydraulic miners later used massive jets of water to melt mountains and free the precious metal. Rich lodegold districts such as Grass Valley and Nevada City were the most productive in California, and innovations such as hydraulic mining began here and spread throughout the nation. Whimsical names like You Bet, Red Dog, Rough and Ready, French Corral, and Blue Tent hint at the colorful beginnings of dozens of camps that grew from wild and chaotic tent towns to bustling young communities, complete with schools, churches, and businesses. Boomtowns North San Juan, North Bloomfield, and Columbia propelled Nevada County to the head of the state's economy by 1900 and hundreds of miles of gold-bearing quartz veins continued to be tapped in underground tunnels for another 50 years or more.

Author Maria E. Brower
Isbn 1439618186
Genre Photography
Year 2006-10-30
Pages 128
Language English
File format PDF

Author ,
Isbn 0984504109
Genre History
Year 2012-01-01
Pages 144
Language English
File format PDF

In 1875, a young man from Pennsylvania known as Captain Jack joined the Dodge Expedition into the Black Hills of Dakota Territory, penning letters to the Omaha Daily Bee during that time and for six months in 1876. John Wallace Crawford, aka Captain Jack, wrote a vibrant account of this fascinating time in the American West. His correspondence featured unusual and intriguing details about the relative merits of the gulches, the vagaries and difficulties of travel in the region, the art of survival in what was essentially wilderness, the hardships of inclement weather, trouble with outlaws, and interactions with American Indians. Award-winning historian Paul L. Hedren has compiled these almost unknown letters, writing an introduction and essays, which result in a treasure trove of hitherto hidden primary documents as well as a ripping yarn in the traditions of the old West. Book jacket.

Author Jack Crawford,Paul L. Hedren
Isbn 0985281782
Genre History
Year 2012
Pages 297
Language English
File format PDF